Audit Program

Phillips Theological Seminary offers classes for no academic credit through an audit program. A limited number of auditors may be permitted in some courses, depending on course size and type.


Weekly On-Campus Courses: Aug 23 - Dec 10, 2021

Some courses may have prerequisites.

AH 650 Religion and Politics

On-Campus Tuesdays:
2:30 pm – 5:15 pm 

While acknowledging the legal separation of church and state, the course will focus on the inevitable and intentional mixing of political and religious discourse. We’ll look at political convention speeches to get a sense of that religious and political overlap. We’ll discuss the area of Civil Religion and the role of Christian Nationalism in the 2016 and 2020 elections, focusing in particular on the rhetoric of President Trump. The presidential election, and its aftermath, will provide a fascinating backdrop for studying the increasing divide within the nation on issues of health (e.g. COVID-19), immigration (e.g., the Wall), and racial equality, (e.g. the execution of George Floyd, Black Lives Matter, and the centennial commemoration of the Tulsa Race Massacre).

No Prerequisites.

Instructor: Joseph A. Bessler, Robert Travis Peake Professor of Theology.

CE 530 Approaches to Christian Education

On-Campus: Tuesdays
8:30 am – 11:15 am

This introductory course will examine different approaches to Christian Education and provide practice in basic teaching, teacher training, and educational ministry-development skills. Students will begin to explore the multiple purposes that the teaching ministry of the church serves and learn how these principles can be used in a variety of ministry settings. Students will also learn to articulate and challenge their own approach to Christian education and develop focused educational planning for their current or envisioned ministry context.

No Prerequisites.

Instructor: Annie Lockhart-Gilroy, Assistant Professor of Christian Education and Practical Theology.

NT 500 Introduction to New Testament

On-campus: Tuesdays
8:30 am – 11:15 am 

An introduction to the writings of the New Testament, to the worlds from which they emerge, and to a range of interpretive methods or questions that interpreters might ask in making meaning of these texts.

No Prerequisites.

Instructor: Warren Carter, LaDonna Kramer Meinders Professor of New Testament.

PW 540 The Theology and Practice of Public Worship

On Campus Tuesdays
6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

An introduction to liturgical theology, or the discipline of theological reflection on the words and actions of the church’s worship, designed for students who will lead worship in communities of faith. While some attention is given to liturgy for occasional services, the primary focus will be on the people of God’s regular Sunday worship.

Prerequisites: FDC 600 and TH 500.

Instructor: Allie Utley, Assistant Professor of Liturgy and Practical Theology.

TH 535 Exploration of Postcolonial Theory and Theologies

On Campus Tuesdays
2:30 pm – 5:15 pm

This course is a survey of the explorations of postcolonial theory and theorists in literature and anti-imperial political contexts and the impact on Christian theologians and theologies. The interplay between the history of Christianity and colonialism for both reinforcing and/or subverting colonial power are explored. The student will be able to identify, describe and analyze the themes of Postcolonial theory as it intersects with the discipline of theology.

No Prerequisites.

Instructor: Lisa Dellinger, Visiting Assistant Professor of Constructive Theologies.

Online Courses: Aug 23 - Dec 10, 2021

Some courses may have prerequisites.

HB 500 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible

Online: asynchronous

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the Hebrew Bible. Students will learn about the historical backgrounds of these texts as well as the process of their composition and canonization. The biblical materials will be approached from an academic/critical perspective with insights into how they might be used in different contemporary contexts. Successful completion of the course will satisfy one of the basic Bible requirements for the Master’s degree programs.

No prerequisites.

Instructor: Lisa W. Davison, Johnnie Eargle Cadieux Professor of Hebrew Bible.

PL 650 Pastoral Leadership and Administration

Online: asynchronous

A survey of practices involved in leading a congregation, with special attention to processes for discerning a particular church’s present and future mission, handling administrative tasks, and carrying out the ongoing integrative work in which such practices are shaped by theology and Christian tradition.

Prerequisite: FDC 600.

Instructor: Kathy McCallie, Assistant Professor of Ministerial Leadership and Ethics.

PT 562 Empathy and the Ethics of Pastoral Care

Online: asynchronous

This course introduces ministry students to foundational theories, practices, and methods of empathy in pastoral care and counseling. More specifically, it is designed to train seminarians to become attentive to how empathy functions in caregiving practices, and to help them develop critical tools for understanding both the strengths and limitations of empathic caregiving. Students are expected to reflect carefully on their own social location, in order to hone ministry practices that are aware of the limits of their empathy. They will also be challenged to consider how empathic listening gives way to other forms of communal pastoral and political praxis. Special attention is paid to the identities, narratives, and unique vulnerabilities of both givers and recipients of pastoral care—including but not limited to race, gender, sexuality, disability, socio-economic status, and trauma.

No Prerequisites.

Instructor: Peter Capretto, Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care in Religion and Culture.

PR 545 Critical Issues in Preaching and Public Communication

Online: asynchronous

In this course students will explore issues related to preaching for social change and transformation, principles of topical preaching, speeches of advocacy, and the development of sermons from difficult texts.

Prerequisites: FDC 600, HB 500, NT 500 and TH 500.

Instructor: Allie Utley, Assistant Professor of Liturgy and Practical Theology.

TH 500 Introduction to Christian Theology

Online: asynchronous

An introduction to the vocabulary, tasks, aims, and scope of theology, and various contextual methods and approaches to the discipline. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to identify, describe, classify, and evaluate influential theological arguments, as well as place those arguments in their historical context.

No Prerequisites.

Instructor: Sarah Morice Brubaker, Associate Professor of Christian Systematic Theology.

TH 880.02 Faith and Reason

Online: asynchronous

This course considers theological epistemologies, or theological accounts of knowledge. Students will consider such questions as: What counts as knowledge and who gets to decide?  What is the relationship between knowledge production, power, and justice? Is knowledge of God possible? Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to describe, compare, and evaluate at least three different accounts of knowledge, and will have begun to construct their own theological epistemologies.

Prerequisites: TH 500.

Instructor: Sarah Morice Brubaker, Associate Professor of Christian Systematic Theology.

 

Intensive Courses

Some courses may have prerequisites.

AH 625 Trauma, Women's Resilience, and the Holy Spirit

Intensive:
Sept 23-25; Oct 28-30 (Thursday – Saturday)

This course investigates the interplay between the impact of trauma and the Holy Spirit on Native American women and their communities. Focusing on three instances of historical, traumatic violence in the lives of Native women of Oklahoma, the Christian doctrine of pneumatology as a means of liberative resistance and healing is discussed. The student will identify, describe, and analyze the development of the Christian doctrine of the Holy Spirit. The student will also demonstrate how this theological locus, pneumatology, can be a source of empowerment despite the embodied social realities of the literal and cultural genocide in the lives of Indigenous women who identify as Christian.

This course will meet on campus September 23 2:30pm-6:30pm, September 24-25 8:30am-5:00pm, October 28 2:30pm-6:30pm and October 29-30 8:30am-5:00pm.

No Prerequisites.

Instructor: Lisa Dellinger, Visiting Assistant Professor of Constructive Theologies.

DS 500 History and Polity of Disciples of Christ

Intensive: August 2-6 (Monday-Friday)

This course examines the development of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and related groups within the Stone-Campbell Movement. This course will focus on important principles as articulated by the founding generations and re-interpreted by subsequent generations in different contexts of social and religious history. This course also explores the contemporary identify, ethos, and structure of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in North American. Required of all Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) students preparing for ordination and encouraged for United Church of Christ students.

This course will meet on campus August 2-6 8:30am – 5:00pm. Recommended

Prerequisites: Phase I Courses.

Instructor: Lisa D. Barnett, Assistant Professor of American Religious History.

PT 515 Introduction to Chaplaincy Studies

Intensive: August 16-20 (Monday-Friday)

Chaplains provide specialized spiritual care and serve as public practical theologians in particular contexts, with expertise in interreligious care, ethics, religious beliefs and practices, and religious diplomacy. This course introduces the theory, practices, experiences, and major issues of chaplaincy as a specialized form of religious leadership. Buddhist, Muslim, and Christian approaches are engaged to illustrate interreligious issues in chaplaincy. The course is appropriate for those preparing for ministries in healthcare, military, prison, higher education, and emerging contexts within chaplaincy. The course meets in a one-week intensive format, with assignments due prior and following our week together.

This course will meet on campus August 16-20 8:30am – 5:00pm.

No Prerequisites.

Instructor: Joshua Morris, Staff Chaplain, Children’s Mercy Hospital.

PT 530 Daughters of God: An Interdisciplinary Study of Girlhood

Intensive: October 11-15 (Monday-Friday)

By placing sociology and developmental theology in conversation with practical theology, this interdisciplinary course explores the development of girlhood from birth to late adolescents. This course is divided into three parts. Part I focuses on readings from theology, psychology, and sociology as we explore what it means to be a gendered person. Part II explores developmental psychology and sociology as we look at developmental concerns specific to girls and ways that that gendered norms are created, with particular attention to how girls form their own sense of girlhood and how this sense is influenced by others. Part III explores the work of practical theologians as we move our focus towards the church and the implications for ministry.

This course will meet on campus October 11-15 8:30am – 5:00pm.

No Prerequisites.

Instructor: Annie Lockhart-Gilroy, Assistant Professor of Christian Education and Practical Theology.

PT 564 Trauma-Informed Care

Intensive: October 18-22 (Monday-Friday)

This course introduces students to essential theory and practice for providing trauma-informed spiritual care. Enrolled students will be trained in foundational principles for offering strategic care for establishing safety and fostering recovery within a variety of settings relevant to ministry and social justice labor. This course also challenges students to think theologically and philosophically on the concept of traumatic experience, including how trauma resists definition. Students are expected to formulate basic positions on the relation of theology to trauma.

This course will meet on campus October 18-22 8:30am – 5:00pm.

No Prerequisites.

Instructor: Peter Capretto, Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care in Religion and Culture.

When choosing a seminary, many factors matter: community, affordability, faculty, and more. Visiting will allow you to see the value PTS offers in these areas. Enjoy the experience by visiting us today.