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February 27, 2015  
  
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Community Announcements Community Announcements Community Announcements

17618830ADeadline: March 15 for Immersion Travel to Nicaragua

 

The nativity scene at left shows Nicaraguans bringing gifts of local art and agriculture to the baby Jesus. The vibrant mural, painted on the wall of a community center/church in a poor neighborhood in Managua, exemplifies the rich culture of the Latin American nation.

“It’s a warm, beautiful, vibrant culture,” said Dr. Kathleen McCallie, who will lead an immersion travel class to Nicaragua from May 29 to June 6. She has visited the country many times since 1993. “It’s helped transform me away from consumerism and been enriching for me spiritually.”

 

Dr. McCallie invites PTS students, alumni and guests to experience the life-giving culture for themselves. The deadline to sign up for the immersion class is March 15. The cost for current students is just $700. That covers air fare, lodging, and meals. Students must have a current passport or have applied for a passport by March 15. Contact Staci staci.copenhaver@ptstulsa.edu to sign up.

 

Participants will explore theological notions of wealth and poverty as they study the complex factors affecting fair trade/free trade in Nicaragua. The group will visit with sweatshop workers in a free trade zone in Managua, for example. The workers earn $2/day making the clothes North Americans wear, Dr. McCallie said.

 

The group will also visit art museums, churches, community programs, and with local leadership. An optional home stay will be available. Home base will be the small town of Chacraseca, where Tulsa-based Just Hope works “to create global partnerships that combat extreme poverty and nurture sustainable community” through intercultural engagement and leadership development. (See http://www.justhope.org/ to learn more.)

 

The immersion class is “a wonderful, life-giving opportunity to open a window into a different culture than our own,” Dr. McCallie said. Phillips recognizes such opportunities as a vital part of seminary education, hence the requirement for an immersion learning course.  Faith leaders are called to work in an increasingly global world, Dr. McCallie said. It’s important to recognize the way our own experiences are conditioned by our cultural contexts and to engage the difficult questions at the intersection of faith, politics, and social justice concerns.

The class includes pre-tour educational preparation and post-tour evaluations and reports. Prerequisite: PC 550; Satisfies Phase II Area VI immersion requirement in post-2013 curriculum or Division VI requirement in pre-2013 curriculum.

For more information, contact Dr. McCallie at (918) 610-8303 or kathy.mccallie@ptstulsa.edu.

Deadline: March 15 for Immersion Travel to Nicaragua

 

The nativity scene at left shows Nicaraguans bringing gifts of local art and agriculture to the baby Jesus. The vibrant mural, painted on the wall of a community center/church in a poor neighborhood in Managua, exemplifies the rich culture of the Latin American nation.

“It’s a warm, beautiful, vibrant culture,” said Dr. Kathleen McCallie, who will lead an immersion travel class to Nicaragua from May 29 to June 6. She has visited the country many times since 1993. “It’s helped transform me away from consumerism and been enriching for me spiritually.”

 

Dr. McCallie invites PTS students, alumni and guests to experience the life-giving culture for themselves. The deadline to sign up for the immersion class is March 15. The cost for current students is just $700. That covers air fare, lodging, and meals. Students must have a current passport or have applied for a passport by March 15. Contact Staci staci.copenhaver@ptstulsa.edu to sign up.

 

Participants will explore theological notions of wealth and poverty as they study the complex factors affecting fair trade/free trade in Nicaragua. The group will visit with sweatshop workers in a free trade zone in Managua, for example. The workers earn $2/day making the clothes North Americans wear, Dr. McCallie said.

 

The group will also visit art museums, churches, community programs, and with local leadership. An optional home stay will be available. Home base will be the small town of Chacraseca, where Tulsa-based Just Hope works “to create global partnerships that combat extreme poverty and nurture sustainable community” through intercultural engagement and leadership development. (See http://www.justhope.org/ to learn more.)

 

The immersion class is “a wonderful, life-giving opportunity to open a window into a different culture than our own,” Dr. McCallie said. Phillips recognizes such opportunities as a vital part of seminary education, hence the requirement for an immersion learning course.  Faith leaders are called to work in an increasingly global world, Dr. McCallie said. It’s important to recognize the way our own experiences are conditioned by our cultural contexts and to engage the difficult questions at the intersection of faith, politics, and social justice concerns.

The class includes pre-tour educational preparation and post-tour evaluations and reports. Prerequisite: PC 550; Satisfies Phase II Area VI immersion requirement in post-2013 curriculum or Division VI requirement in pre-2013 curriculum.

For more information, contact Dr. McCallie at (918) 610-8303 or kathy.mccallie@ptstulsa.edu.


17618861ASummer Enrollment Opens March 2

Notice from the Registrar –

 

Summer schedules will be emailed to students on Monday.

 

Please read carefully, paying particular attention to the enrollment deadline for the Nicaragua Immersion Course.

Summer Enrollment Opens March 2

Notice from the Registrar –

 

Summer schedules will be emailed to students on Monday.

 

Please read carefully, paying particular attention to the enrollment deadline for the Nicaragua Immersion Course.


17618872AChapel Worship March 2-6

 

The Rev. Judy Aaron, director of Student Services, will give the homily on Tuesday. Judy spoke eloquently about the effects of the Doctrine of Discovery on Native American peoples in chapel a few weeks ago.

  

The Rev. Dr. Richard Ward, Craddock Professor of Homiletics and Worship , will give the homily on Thursday. Dr. Ward's preaching needs no introduction! You won't want to miss seeing this master in action.

Chapel Worship March 2-6

 

The Rev. Judy Aaron, director of Student Services, will give the homily on Tuesday. Judy spoke eloquently about the effects of the Doctrine of Discovery on Native American peoples in chapel a few weeks ago.

  

The Rev. Dr. Richard Ward, Craddock Professor of Homiletics and Worship , will give the homily on Thursday. Dr. Ward's preaching needs no introduction! You won't want to miss seeing this master in action.


        

Library Corner Library Corner Library Corner

17618840LCCopyright Rules Apply to Internet: Fair Use Factors for Avoiding Infringement

 

Copyright can be a confusing issue for students – and faculty! Often people think materials found on the web are free to use. But any created work on the Internet (this includes  unpublished works on paper) is copyrighted by default unless the copyright owner states otherwise. Even Facebook and Twitter have copyright infringement reporting procedures! It’s always wise to use the Fair Use factors to help your judgment:

 

1)      What will you be using it for? Will there be a commercial benefit, or is it for nonprofit, educational purposes? Commercial uses without permission are generally not considered fair use.

 

2)      What kind of work is it? If a work is fiction it is much more difficult to justify using it without the copyright holder’s permission.

 

3)      How much will you use/borrow? Sometimes a large amount is not problematic if it does not contain the “heart” of the work; on the other hand taking a tiny part that contains the heart can constitute a violation.

 

4)      Will your use of the copyrighted work affect the marketability of the original?

 

These are just some considerations to keep in mind as you use books and the Internet this semester. Ask for Amanda or Sandy in the library to help you think through any questions you might have. We aren’t lawyers, but we might be able to steer you clear of danger.

 

Sandy Shapoval

Director of the Library 

Copyright Rules Apply to Internet: Fair Use Factors for Avoiding Infringement

 

Copyright can be a confusing issue for students – and faculty! Often people think materials found on the web are free to use. But any created work on the Internet (this includes  unpublished works on paper) is copyrighted by default unless the copyright owner states otherwise. Even Facebook and Twitter have copyright infringement reporting procedures! It’s always wise to use the Fair Use factors to help your judgment:

 

1)      What will you be using it for? Will there be a commercial benefit, or is it for nonprofit, educational purposes? Commercial uses without permission are generally not considered fair use.

 

2)      What kind of work is it? If a work is fiction it is much more difficult to justify using it without the copyright holder’s permission.

 

3)      How much will you use/borrow? Sometimes a large amount is not problematic if it does not contain the “heart” of the work; on the other hand taking a tiny part that contains the heart can constitute a violation.

 

4)      Will your use of the copyrighted work affect the marketability of the original?

 

These are just some considerations to keep in mind as you use books and the Internet this semester. Ask for Amanda or Sandy in the library to help you think through any questions you might have. We aren’t lawyers, but we might be able to steer you clear of danger.

 

Sandy Shapoval

Director of the Library 


        

Student Senate Student Senate Student Senate

17618850SS"We Think We Can!"
 
Greetings! You can do it!!  Remember the Little Engine that Could: “We think we can. We think we can!" 
 
 
1.      Welcome, Concentrated Course Students!!  We are so happy to see you on campus!

 

2.      If you haven’t had a chance to check out Chapel here at PTS, we invite you to choose chapel this week!  You can check out the tweets that come from it at #Phillipsworship

 

3.      For help with research, please speak with our wonderful librarians.  They can help with using the EBSCO databases and creating a place for you to store your research articles electronically.  They are wonderful, friendly, and ready to help!

 

Please don’t hesitate to talk to your senators: Ulysses Allen, Verla Miller, Thomas Corrigan, Nick Van Dam, Angie Combs, and Mik King online. http://ptstulsa.edu/StudentSenate

 

Grace and peace,

 

mik

 

P.S. If you are absolutely thrilled to hear that Jules has returned to PTS, you might be in seminary. Welcome back, Jules!!!  We missed you and are so happy to have you here! 

"We Think We Can!"

 
Greetings! You can do it!!  Remember the Little Engine that Could: “We think we can. We think we can!" 
 
 
1.      Welcome, Concentrated Course Students!!  We are so happy to see you on campus!

 

2.      If you haven’t had a chance to check out Chapel here at PTS, we invite you to choose chapel this week!  You can check out the tweets that come from it at #Phillipsworship

 

3.      For help with research, please speak with our wonderful librarians.  They can help with using the EBSCO databases and creating a place for you to store your research articles electronically.  They are wonderful, friendly, and ready to help!

 

Please don’t hesitate to talk to your senators: Ulysses Allen, Verla Miller, Thomas Corrigan, Nick Van Dam, Angie Combs, and Mik King online. http://ptstulsa.edu/StudentSenate

 

Grace and peace,

 

mik

 

P.S. If you are absolutely thrilled to hear that Jules has returned to PTS, you might be in seminary. Welcome back, Jules!!!  We missed you and are so happy to have you here! 


        

Seminary Snapshots Seminary Snapshots Seminary Snapshots

17618880CMJesus Will Come — But He's Bringing Friends!

 

As the Lent season begins, many congregations use this time to evaluate our relationship with God, how our lives reflect that relationship, and the challenges we have in maintaining our faith. My congregation and I have been engaging in conversation through a Lenten study titled, “Giving Up Something Bad for Lent,” by James W. Moore.  The study focuses on some of the not-so-pretty aspects of human nature and on not doing certain things during the 40 days of Lent instead of the usual denial of good things, i.e. chocolate, soft drinks, coffee.  The challenge is to maintain this practice after Lent is over.  I think Mr. Moore has developed an excellent back-door strategy to actually get human beings to be in good relationship, not only with God, but with one another.  Is that an astonishing revelation? That it’s not enough to be in right relationship with God; the way of Jesus is to be in right relationship with one another.

 

I strongly encourage you to listen to the Chapel recordings on the Phillips website this week. (http://ptstulsa.edu/ChapelRecordings)  Josh Linton, Phillips Recruiter, brought the Word home Tuesday during chapel as he spoke of a Jesus who is displaced and is still haunting us today.  Josh’s words of belonging even while being told there is no room for you in Christianity were healing.  Rev. Alexis Carter brought a message of how God challenges us to say "no" to what we are familiar or comfortable with, trusting God will make provision.  I particularly like a proverb she shared which I will paraphrase:  When you ask Jesus to come, his response is, “I will come, but I’m bringing friends.”

 

Studying the history of Christianity and understanding how the path of faith has come thus far helps us to understand the context of those encountering the way of Jesus during biblical times.  This knowledge gives us perspective as biblical scholars so that we may discern the many ways of Jesus and speak to how Jesus shows up in diverse ways.  The picture or view of Jesus is not always pretty because it speaks to the broken in us.  When I speak of right relationship, I am not asking us to choose who is right or who is wrong in our interpretation of Jesus or how our faith should be lived.  I’m asking us to consider that in our right relationship with God we somehow find ourselves in God’s love, and that in our right relationship with one another we actually “see” each other in love.  

 

You as a seminary student, minister, educator, or disciple are creating history right now.  Someday a person will study the historical context of our times to better understand our encounter with God.  Do you want them to read how you gave up the comfortable things, like chocolate, or how the world was transformed through your welcoming Jesus — and all of his friends? 

 

Peace,

 

Judy

Jesus Will Come — But He's Bringing Friends!

 

As the Lent season begins, many congregations use this time to evaluate our relationship with God, how our lives reflect that relationship, and the challenges we have in maintaining our faith. My congregation and I have been engaging in conversation through a Lenten study titled, “Giving Up Something Bad for Lent,” by James W. Moore.  The study focuses on some of the not-so-pretty aspects of human nature and on not doing certain things during the 40 days of Lent instead of the usual denial of good things, i.e. chocolate, soft drinks, coffee.  The challenge is to maintain this practice after Lent is over.  I think Mr. Moore has developed an excellent back-door strategy to actually get human beings to be in good relationship, not only with God, but with one another.  Is that an astonishing revelation? That it’s not enough to be in right relationship with God; the way of Jesus is to be in right relationship with one another.

 

I strongly encourage you to listen to the Chapel recordings on the Phillips website this week. (http://ptstulsa.edu/ChapelRecordings)  Josh Linton, Phillips Recruiter, brought the Word home Tuesday during chapel as he spoke of a Jesus who is displaced and is still haunting us today.  Josh’s words of belonging even while being told there is no room for you in Christianity were healing.  Rev. Alexis Carter brought a message of how God challenges us to say "no" to what we are familiar or comfortable with, trusting God will make provision.  I particularly like a proverb she shared which I will paraphrase:  When you ask Jesus to come, his response is, “I will come, but I’m bringing friends.”

 

Studying the history of Christianity and understanding how the path of faith has come thus far helps us to understand the context of those encountering the way of Jesus during biblical times.  This knowledge gives us perspective as biblical scholars so that we may discern the many ways of Jesus and speak to how Jesus shows up in diverse ways.  The picture or view of Jesus is not always pretty because it speaks to the broken in us.  When I speak of right relationship, I am not asking us to choose who is right or who is wrong in our interpretation of Jesus or how our faith should be lived.  I’m asking us to consider that in our right relationship with God we somehow find ourselves in God’s love, and that in our right relationship with one another we actually “see” each other in love.  

 

You as a seminary student, minister, educator, or disciple are creating history right now.  Someday a person will study the historical context of our times to better understand our encounter with God.  Do you want them to read how you gave up the comfortable things, like chocolate, or how the world was transformed through your welcoming Jesus — and all of his friends? 

 

Peace,

 

Judy


        


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