Home > Academics > Course Offerings > Area III-History of Christianity

 

Courses in Area III: History of Christianity
History of Christianity
HC 600 The Social World of Early Christianity

A social analysis of the origins and development of early Christianity utilizing historical and social scientific approaches, emphasizing a comparative study of literature, art, archaeology, and social institutions of the ancient world and their relation to the church's developing theology. Prerequisites: PC 550 and PC600.

HC 650 Christianity in the United States

An introduction to the themes, figures, issues and movements affecting religious life and society in the U.S. from pre-colonial settlement to the present day. Prerequisites:  PC 550 and PC 600.

HC 675 Women & Religion in the United States

This course is a survey of the history of women and religion in the U.S. from the colonial period to the present. The primary focus is on women who practice the Christian faith, but some attention is given to women in other religions. Students will explore the contributions of women to the development and expression of religions; the complex relationships among society, religion, culture; and ways that these relationships have impacted, and been impacted by, the lives of women.

HC 700 Makers of Christianity in the 20th Century

An exploration of major 20th century movements in church and society by attending to some of the biographies and/or autobiographies of important leaders.  Prerequisites:  PC 550 and PC 600.

HC 760 The Black Church in America

Study will focus on the moral and religious traditions of African American churches and the ways that these traditions have influenced life in America.  Particular attention will be given to the prominent role that the Black Church has played as a social, political and cultural center in the African American community.  A principle presupposition underlying the course content is the view that the term 'Black Church' is employed as a shorthand designation for the thick diversity and complexity of Black Christian Traditions that comprise African American Christian experience. Recommended prerequisite: PC 550.

Booklist - Fall 2014, taught by Ray A. Owens
Syllabus - Fall 2014, taught by Ray A. Owens
HC 770 Religion & the Civil Rights Movement

This course examines the ways in which religious beliefs, practices and institutions helped to form and inform the modern Civil Rights movement in the United States. What role did religion play in igniting the quest for civil rights? How did religion form and inform the Anti-Civil Rights Movement and it key players? How did the religious identities of movement leaders impact the content and contours of the civil rights project? Was the Black Church a source of support for or resistance to the ideals and practices of the movement? What role did white churches play in supporting and/or resisting the modern Civil Rights Movement? This course explores these broad questions through an interdisciplinary study of primary and secondary sources (speeches, sermons, video presentations, essays, songs, scholarly texts and articles) related to the modern Civil Rights movement. Recommended prerequisite: PC 550.

Syllabus - Spring 2012, taught by Ray A. Owens
HC 880 Seminar in the History of Christianity

A study of selected issues, figures, or movements in the history of Christianity. May be repeated with different topics. Prerequisites:  PC 550 and PC 600.

HC 880.01 Early Christianities

Early Christianity, from its beginnings in the first century to its acceptance as a legitimate religion of the Roman Empire in the fourth century, is a complex and variegated phenomenon. This course investigates the diversity of early Christianities in the first four centuries of the common era. We will focus on the demarcation of Christianity from Judaism, the forms of self-definition that emerge in the period of imperial persecution, and the shifts that take place when the movement gains the support of the Roman emperors in the fourth century. Emphasis will be placed on working with ancient texts and situating them in their broader historical and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: PC 500 and PC 600. Satisfies History of Christianity requirement or elective.

HC 880.02 Faith and Reason

This course considers theological understandings of knowledge, faith, belief, reason, and truth. Students will consider such questions as: What counts as true knowledge? What makes a belief warranted? Can you hold a belief that is true, but not have come to hold that belief in an appropriate way? What is the role of the body in arriving at knowledge? The course will also consider how answers to these questions have changed over time, in ways that both reflect and facilitate changing worldviews and political arrangements. Upon successful completion of the course, students will have begun to claim and fine-tune their own theological epistemologies, and will have gained skill in evaluating truth claims using the analytical tools we will practice in class. Prerequisites: PC 600 (required) and PC 550 (recommended).

HC 880.03 Women and Gender in Early Christianity

This course will engage and interpret primary sources related to women and gender from the 1st-5th centuries of the Common Era. We will aim to understand how ideas, behaviors, and roles related to women and gender were shaped, maintained, policed, and transformed over time, especially through the processes of Christianization. We will pay special attention to the use of gender as a category of analysis for the study of history by reading theoretical work on gender alongside historical, primary sources and secondary scholarship. Prerequisites: PC 550 and PC 600.

HC 880.04 Martyrs and Saints in the Early Church

Martyrs and saints figure prominently in the literature of Christian late antiquity. But Christians were neither original nor unique in their descriptions of individuals lauded for their singular greatness. This course will explore the Christian innovation to constructions of self as sufferer by exploring martyrologies and hagiographies from the late-ancient Mediterranean world. Several questions will undergird our analysis including: what are the defining characteristics of a martyr or a saint? how is holiness being constructed in these texts? how are issues related to identity (gender, sexuality, and the body, for example), being constructed? These and other questions will prompt us to consider contemporary questions around truth, faith, suffering, and violence. Prerequisites: PC 550 (required) and PC 600 (recommended).

HC 880.05 Imag(in)ing God: A History of Images, Icons, and Idols in Early Christianity

Late-ancient Christians demonstrated strong feelings regarding the representations of the divine. Therefore, images and icons take on important significance for how these Christians chose to represent, revere, and contemplate the Jesus Christ and the long litany of saints. The iconoclastic controversies of the 8th and 9th centuries represent the tensions between opposing views. This course considers the history of these controversies by first examining the use and interpretation of ancient images of the divine and the later discourses and controversies surrounding these histories. Special attention will be paid to ancient discourses with some focus on contemporary issues and theories regarding imag(in)ing, representation, icons, idols, and veneration. Prerequisites: PC 550 (required) and PC 600 (recommended).

HC 900 Research in the History of Christianity

Advanced individual research on selected issues and topics. Offered on request only to advanced students. Prerequisites:  PC 550 and PC 600.

Denominational Studies
DS 500 History and Polity of the Disciples of Christ

The origin, development, organization, and theological interests of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) studied in the context of American social and religious history. Required of all Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) students preparing for ordination. Enrollment encouraged for United Church of Christ students. Recommended Prerequisites: all four Portal Courses.

DS 525 Stone-Campbell Theology

This course is structured to survey theological themes, propositions, and ideas informing and emerging from the Stone-Campbell movement of 19th century North America with particular attention paid to the theology of Alexander Campbell and Barton Warren Stone. DS 500 or instructor's signature required. Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses.

DS 550 United Methodist History

This course, required for candidates for ordination in the United Methodist Church, will inform students about the basic periods of United Methodist history. Particular attention will be paid to events, movements, and persons that have shaped the denomination. Recommended Prerequisites: PC 550 and PC 600.

DS 575 United Methodist Doctrine

This course, required for candidates for ordination in the United Methodist Church, is an introduction to theology in the Wesleyan tradition as practiced in United Methodism. Attention will be paid to John Wesley's theology, to an historical overview of the persons and movements in United Methodist history, and to the current revival of Wesleyan theology and debate about theological method. Recommended Prerequisites:  PC 500, PC 550, and PC 600.

DS 600 Advanced Wesleyan Theology

Intended for students who have completed the basic United Methodist Doctrine course, this offering will allow students to explore in greater depth various aspects of John Wesley's theology, teaching, and lived embodiment of Christianity. Material by Charles Wesley and Susanna Wesley will also be considered. Theological method will be addressed in depth. Using case studies, students will examine how Wesleyan theology informs United Methodist teaching and practice today. Recommended Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses and DS 575.

DS 625 United Methodist Polity

This course, required for candidates for orders in the United Methodist Church, is designed to acquaint students with the 2016 Book of Discipline and a sense of how its rules and requirements come to life in the practical affairs of the church, as well as to help students understand how polity is related to the church's historical and theological development. Recommended Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses.

Booklist - Spring 2017, taught by Grayson L. Lucky
Syllabus - Spring 2015, taught by Grayson L. Lucky
DS 650 Baptist History and Polity

A study of Baptist life and thought from the seventeenth century to the present with particular attention to the development of diverse Baptist communities in the United States. Recommended Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses.

DS 675 Baptist Theological Perspectives

A study of foundational theological perspectives in the development of Baptist traditions and communities and a consideration of contemporary doctrinal trends. Recommended Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses.

DS 700 Presbyterians in the United States

An historical study of the faith, institutions, and practices of Presbyterians in the United States, with particular attention to developments within the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) since the Civil War. Recommended Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses.

DS 725 Presbyterian Polity and Worship

A reflective and practical study of church leadership in government and worship as guided by the present polity of the Presbyterian Church (USA). Recommended Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses.

DS 750 History and Polity of the United Church of Christ

An exploration of the history, theology, structure, and practice of ministry within the United Church of Christ. Required for all United Church of Christ students preparing for ordination. Enrollment is encouraged for Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) students. Recommended Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses.

Syllabus - Spring 2011, taught by Leslie Penrose
DS 775 History and Polity of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

An exploration of the history, theology, structure, and practice of ministry within the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Recommended Prerequisites: all four Portal Courses.

DS 800 History and Polity of Unitarian Universalism

An exploration of the history, theology, structure, and practice of ministry within the Unitarian Universalist Church in America. Recommended Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses.

DS 825 Readings in Denominational History

Guided individual research or seminar designed to acquaint students with the history and character of a denomination in which they intend to practice ministry. Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses.

DS 850 Seminar in Denominational Studies

A study of selected issues, figures, or movements in the development of a Protestant tradition(s). movement. May be repeated with different topics. Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses.

DS 880 Readings in the History of the Modern Ecumenical Movement

Guided individual research or seminar designed to acquaint students with the history and character of a denomination in which they intend to practice ministry. Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses.

DS 900 Seminar in the History of the Modern Ecumenical Movement

A study of selected issues, figures, or movements in the modern ecumenical movement. May be repeated with different topics. Prerequisites:  all four Portal Courses.

Phillips Theological Seminary offers Christian graduate theological education
in service of intelligent, just, and compassionate religious and civic communities. We welcome
students to a safe space for truth-seeking conversations about the Bible, Jesus, and faithful living.
Courses available on campus and online for certificate, diploma, MDiv, MAMC, MASJ, & MTS
programs, and on campus for the DMin program.

Phillips Theological Seminary

901 N. Mingo Road
Tulsa, OK 74116

p 918-610-8303
f 918-610-8404

Campus & Directions

Site content © 2005-16 Phillips Theological Seminary

The materials on this website are owned, held, or licensed by Phillips Theological Seminary and are available for personal, non-commercial, and educational use, provided Phillips is properly cited. Any commercial use of the materials, without the written permission by Phillips Theological Seminary, is strictly prohibited.

Site design, programming, and CMS © 2005-16 Verdend Interactive

Like PTS on Facebook
Follow PTS on Twitter
Subscribe to RSS and Podcasts